July 22, 2014
How do we forgive ourselves for all of the things we did not become?

"14 Lines from Love Letters or Suicide Notes" by David ‘Doc’ Luben  (via bruisedkneesclub)

maybe a good way to look at it is focusing on the things we have become because of the things we did not.

(via nogreatillusion)

psych2go:

For more posts like these, go visit psych2go
Psych2go features various psychological findings and myths. In the future, psych2go attempts to include sources to posts for the for the purpose of generating discussions and commentaries. This will give readers a chance to critically examine psychology. 

and will we stop making this mistake? will we just let people be who they are instead of trapping them into the cages built from our persistent expectations? but is this truly bad for the individuals? some people are like water, they need containers; and sometimes they meet their containers who will shape them into who they are meant to be. but then, sometimes that doesn’t happen, and they spend their entire lives fitting a square into a circle. in the end, they are left with rougher than ever edges and broken psyches.

psych2go:

For more posts like these, go visit psych2go

Psych2go features various psychological findings and myths. In the future, psych2go attempts to include sources to posts for the for the purpose of generating discussions and commentaries. This will give readers a chance to critically examine psychology.

and will we stop making this mistake? will we just let people be who they are instead of trapping them into the cages built from our persistent expectations? but is this truly bad for the individuals? some people are like water, they need containers; and sometimes they meet their containers who will shape them into who they are meant to be. but then, sometimes that doesn’t happen, and they spend their entire lives fitting a square into a circle. in the end, they are left with rougher than ever edges and broken psyches.

(via psych-facts)

I used to call people, then I got into e-mailing, then texting, and now I just ignore everyone.
The New Yorker (via nudelip)

(Source: candysoda, via weallhaveastorytotell-)

nemfrog:

Fig 63. To find the long and short months. 1904.

thought this was cool because this was the way my mother taught me about it.

nemfrog:

Fig 63. To find the long and short months. 1904.

thought this was cool because this was the way my mother taught me about it.

(via ilovecharts)

July 20, 2014
this is pretty cool, I kinda wanna do that for chobley.

this is pretty cool, I kinda wanna do that for chobley.

(Source: gu-avajuice, via weallhaveastorytotell-)

I’d like to understand why it is difficult to appreciate things

until they are gone. the notion is that when we have it, we don’t notice it; but we depend on it. thus, when we do not have it, we notice our dependence upon it from before, and we “appreciate” it posthumously. (I see appreciation as a very present-act, I don’t think you can appreciate something after it is over because the object is not receiving the appreciation. appreciation must be felt in order for it to truly be an appreciation; hence the quotations). but the key thing is that we do not notice the thing itself after it is gone, we notice our dependence on it. does that qualify as true appreciation for the object itself? I don’t think this is the case for all things we “appreciate,” but it is the case for most things. if there is truth in this, I feel like it is such a freeing concept. it means that we are functional without that object, we merely need to get over the hurdle of our dependence upon it. one of the best and worst things about human beings is that we are creatures of habit. once we no longer depend on it, we remain in the inertia and our lives are fixed. but similarly, once we do depend on it, and it never goes away, we depend on it forever.

When one does not have what one wants, one must want what one has.

― Sigmund Freud (via psych-quotes)

despite the controversy against Freud, he remains one of my favorite psychologists. many of the things he proposes have much truth in them, which explains why psychologists today are still utilizing his theories.

(via psych-facts)

July 14, 2014

I wonder if people would rather have the talent of being able to perfectly articulate their thoughts but a lack of any deep/meaningful ideas or be plagued with the disability to articulate but a plethora of good ideas. I guess the question is does it matter if people do not agree/understand that you are right if you truly believe you are right. I think it’s hard to live completely in isolation, which means in one way or another, we live our lives in relevance to others. this also means that the statement “it doesn’t matter what others think” is, at least in some ways, false. this is why there is always an urge to ask people if you’re crazy; it’s also why there is always a debate of right and wrong. so maybe a better question is how much it matters and under what circumstances it matters. is it foolish to have the confidence that you’re always right, or is that the most brilliant quality a human being can own?

I find that in most cases, it’s easier to accept your own mistakes and shortcomings and grow than to fixate on the few things you’re right about and condemn others. there will probably come a day when you’ll realize you’re not perfect, and it’d be difficult to go back and accept everything that’s wrong with you.

July 13, 2014
mariechristinadigby:

A sneak peek at our performance of ‘the keeper’ out on iTunes 10-22-13 :) @kinagrannis #thekeeper

There are so many things I love about Marie Digby.

mariechristinadigby:

A sneak peek at our performance of ‘the keeper’ out on iTunes 10-22-13 :) @kinagrannis #thekeeper

There are so many things I love about Marie Digby.

Missing the boo and his mummy, hope they’re doing well!!